Bike Machines

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Re: Bike Machines

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Sat Jul 07, 2012 11:37 pm

Here is a foot powered scroll saw, http://www.vintageprojects.com/power-to ... llsaw1.pdf Its made of wood and is adjustable. If we had the time there are no end to the projects we could make for ourselves. :lol: Now I have the time, I just don't have the desire any more. :D
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Re: Bike Machines

Postby Lollykoko » Sun Jul 08, 2012 4:45 pm

Thanks so much for the PDF's, Guy. My brother is interested in pedal power woodworking since our trip to the Stone's Trace reenactment last year. The woodworking shop there was built in the early 1800's, though some of the equipment has been repaired since then.
Well, I can't figure out how to post the cropped photo showing a fellow in period garb doing some woodworking! Just as well probably since it saves your bandwidth. :lol:
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Re: Bike Machines

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Sun Jul 08, 2012 7:03 pm

I went to Old Beford Village some years ago, it is off the Beford exit of the Pa turn pike. They have torn down and rebuilt log cabins from all around central Pa, WVa, and Md and created a village complete with black smiths, gardens, candle makes etc. There was a guy there cutting out jig saw puzzles with a treadle powered jig saw from the 1860's. It was great to watch him work. The saw worked unbelievable well, or maybe it was just that he was a craftsman. Either way I was Impressed.
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Re: Bike Machines

Postby chachi » Sat Dec 08, 2012 7:03 pm

this reminds me of a travel program i saw on paraguay that showed a bike hooked up to an old side load commercial machine. not as portable as this british fellow's design (which i really like, btw), but good for home use. my question is what sort of time do yo have to do on a machine like this to get a full load clean? ten minutes might be good for one flimsy undergarment but what about some pants and towels?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yh4D6Ya7TKI
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Re: Bike Machines

Postby George Collins » Sat Jan 05, 2013 10:18 am

While making sausage recently, I found myself wishing frequently for a pedal powered sausage grinder.

I've not yet studied up much on this technology but seems to me that for it to be viable, it would need the equivalent of a PTO (power take off) akin to that of a tractor in principle to allow one machine to have broad applications.
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Re: Bike Machines

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Sun Jan 06, 2013 5:46 pm

I think that could easily be done with a grain mill, sausage stuffer, corn sheller, and maybe even an electrical generator. All you would need is one basic way to bolt all of the tools to be powered by the bike chain to the frame work in the same way so they all fit the same. Once you had a tool attached to the frame work with the bike it should be a simple matter to have the chain adjust to fit the tool with an idler arm like the ones used in 10 speed bikes to adjust the chain tension. You could use different sized sprockets for the different tools to adjust their RPM's and speed as needed. At least that idea seems to work out well in my head, lol, are there any engineers out there who feel that the idea would not work in practice? Gravely Walk Behind Tractors were successful for 50 years because every tool, every attachment that they ever made from 1940 on would all bolt on to the same 4 bolt system on their power units. So every Gravely Tractor could use every Gravely Attachment. It just makes sense to me to have a standard bolt pattern for all of your attachments.
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Re: Bike Machines

Postby GrahamB » Sun Jan 06, 2013 10:31 pm

Guy, I have looked at this stuff for over a year now and the applications are endless. I agree that finding a standard pattern would be the way to go. Even Snap-On tools started that way with all the sockets necessary to repair a tractor being snapped on to a common handle.
I have even looked at a stationary unit driving a winch that could be used for field work. The plow, cultivator or harrow being pulled across the field by the bicycle winch. I first started thinking about this one when I was digging out the muck from my pond this summer. The digging wasn't so bad, but the hauling up of the buckets to the vegetable patch was a killer. I thought about having the winch at the top of the hill, pulling the cart up from the pond.
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Re: Bike Machines

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Sun Jan 06, 2013 11:09 pm

Years ago most major manufactures of Farm Tractors had their own system to attach farm equipment. Ford had the 3 point hitch, Farmall had the International Fast hitch,
Alis Chalmers had their own that I can't name right now. The Ford 3 point hitch distributed the weight best and made implements easier to pull, so it eventually won out after it came off patent. I guess my point here is that we should try and design the best system we can think of to attach the various equipment to the fixed bike unit. Ease of putting it on and taking it off should be a very high priority as well as having the tool attached very tightly so that it does not vibrate and work loose. It should be easy to fabricate and easy to duplicate for new pieces of equipment. Minimum welding, grinding and drilling of thick metal pieces should be considered in the design. That would be the way I would approach the problem at least because I am a dummy when it comes to welding, grinding and drilling thick metal parts. lol Maybe a hook or slide arrangement on one side of the fastener plate with at least 2 bolts holding the opposite side so that it couldn't slide or work loose. The other option is of course to use a different bike for each implement, it turns out that used bikes with out wheels or tires are pretty cheap and very available every where. ;) . Storage of that number of bikes could get to be an issue I suppose, it depends on how many applications you have for bike powered tools. :D You may want some set up permanently [ Like a water pump for Lollys new well ] and some that you can change easily [ Like a grinding wheel, grain mill, jig saw, etc. ] Make the design fit your needs and how you plan on using the pedal power.
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Re: Bike Machines

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Mon Jan 07, 2013 10:42 pm

This guy seems to have a very good 3 bolt system designed to attach a number of different tools to be powered. I like having the tools in front of you where you can use your hands freely.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&v=0cj ... =endscreen
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Re: Bike Machines

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Sun Jan 13, 2013 2:15 am

Here is a video of a home made electrical generator system that uses an alternator from an automobile and a 10 speed bike. This might be a very reasonable alternative to the system made here in Pittsburgh that I posted earlier in this thread. Their bike generator was about $500. This unit uses an alternator that you can pick up for around $65 to $80. The bike stand you can easily made yourself. The 2 draw backs that I see for this unit compared to the unit manufactured here is that the alternator normally does not start to make electric until about 1000 rpm's and the larger pulley wheel on the alternator would give less rpm multiplier than the much narrower axis that the manufactured unit employs in their unit. Having said that, This DIY unit seems to work well, and once the alternator kicks in I believe it will continue to produce electric even if the rpm's drop below the 1000 mark. If you buy a size 27 lead acid battery [ Think large marine Battery, or RV battery ] that costs between $225 to $250 for a good one and add a 110 volt converter which I am not sure about the cost [ $150 to $250 maybe less I think ] you have a unit that will operate just like the unit that costs $1000. Their unit has 2 plugs and a ground fault breaker for safety as well as other safety features I am sure, and is sealed water tight, but still, quite a difference in costs. If you were to use the Bike unit with the battery back up and inverter as an emergency back up to run your furnace fan and kept the battery charged before the power goes out it should work to get you through a normal power outage. For long outages, or if you wanted to run your ref and freezer you maybe pumping a lot on the bike. But for providing a small amount of electric to an isolated location, like Lollys camp site it could provide enough electric to make life a lot easier by running lights, small appliances, power tools etc. I like the set up this guy has, except for the crappy battery he used. What do you all think about this guys set up? I would love to hear your thoughts.

hhttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzQiurf ... VAZIDFMRXY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?annotation ... 0x5j8_PKZw

I would not recommend having an extension cord wrapped up like he shows in video #2 in this kind of application. It acts like an electro-magnet and tends to get hot which drains a lot of power. Just stretch out the extension cord and you will be fine.

Here is an even cheaper, although not nearly as good system that uses a 12 volt electric motor and a car battery. There is no inverter to run 110 volt with this system but I am sure it could be added. The car battery he is trying to use is NOT designed to give off all of its charge and then be recharged. It will fry its self fairly quickly under that type of usage. But he did make some electric, and it was very cheap to make. :lol:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tzQiurfsypI
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