Another Illinois 'stead

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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby mannytheseacow » Wed Apr 03, 2013 12:44 am

Do you have a commercial mill or did you construct one from plans, either purchased or intuitive?


Lolly, Sorry I didn't mean to mis-speak. I don't have a sawmill. I saw an ad in the paper years ago for a guy that "has saw, will travel". Became the beginning of a great friendship. He's got a "Lumberking" I think it's called. I think it was pretty expensive... far beyond my price range. Anyway, those are the kind of things that make for a great community. One person has this and another person has that. When I get enough logs to make it worth his while he'll drag the saw up here and slice some boards out for me, we'll drink some homebrews and argue about fishing. I've seen some awesome homebuilt sawmills but I'll never consider getting one as long as this friend of mine is alive.
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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby Lollykoko » Wed Apr 03, 2013 2:11 pm

Not a problem, Manny. Knowing someone that you enjoy spending time with that also has a tool you can utilize is a wonderful thing, I think. I have heard that someone in my general area has a portable saw mill, but it is a friend of a friend of a friend sort of deal and I still haven't gotten a name and phone number to chat with the mill owner.

I have been looking at portable mills (and the plans to build your own) for several years and have serious tool envy. At the same time, given my age and gender, obtaining a mill would be just the first step. Next I'd have to find a couple of younger, taller folks with high testosterone levels to do the actual work while I sit around drinking homebrew and supervising. :lol:
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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Wed Apr 03, 2013 4:01 pm

A neighbor of mine has a Band Saw Mill. It is a wonderful thing to have, he borders my property in the back. If he who dies with the most toys wins, This guy is going to WIN, :lol: He no only has the mill, he has a Folk Lift to haul the logs into place, and a Tilt Bed Tuck to haul the logs. He can also deliver the staked wood when he is done sawing it. Like I said, he is going to win. :lol: Talk about some serious Tool Envy, I have it, but as it turns out, he is a pretty nice fellow and is more than happy to help out a neighbor. He saws all of the wood for my other neighbor that makes the furniture, he has offered to cut for me if I needed any thing. I don't go to the work of Home Brew, but I have shared a PBR or maybe 2 over the years. ;) Its better to have friends Lolly, especially at our age. You don't need to Own a Mill, Lolly, you need to know somebody who has one. It will be better, cheaper , and will suit your needs . You just need to plan ahead and have all of your logs ready to go when the mill gets there.
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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby Lollykoko » Thu Apr 04, 2013 3:47 am

Guy, you are probably right. Son Joe used to tell me I needed to date an Amish lumberjack. ;)
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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Thu Apr 04, 2013 1:29 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: I liked that, ;)
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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby dave brenneman » Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:43 pm

mannytheseacow wrote:
Hmm, perhaps a section of this forum could be dedicated to beekeeping if there's much interest in it? Otherwise, I'm happy to answer any other questions you have right here, share what I know, and help figure out what we don't. I just dug into my hive the other day and noticed some black mold in the corners. I'm not too worried about it but that's something I'm looking into.


Speaking for myself only, I prefer it when a forum's not divided up into too many topics. It's been my experience that forums going that route end up slowing down. I don't think there is such a huge volume of new posts here that so much sorting is needed, so put your beekeeping info wherever it seems relevant. Just my opinion.
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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Tue Apr 09, 2013 1:54 pm

I would love to see a Bee Keeping Forum. There is a lot of information and a lot to learn about keeping bees. I keep watching for a swarm that I might keep. :D
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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby dave brenneman » Fri Apr 12, 2013 4:20 pm

I just read an email from a friend in Latvia. He said they've had a particularly long winter - snow from October until now - which has been hard on the bee population. It's meant less food available for the bees, plus increased infections in the hives... I was thinking about possible solutions like greenhouses for bees to forage in, or even incorporation inside an Earthship... not sure if I would want to live in that one though.
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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby mannytheseacow » Fri Apr 12, 2013 6:41 pm

Yah, we've had a hard winter here, too. Hopefully beekeepers take care of their bees and there won't be any issues. As I've said before, I picked a strain of bees (Russians) that are adapted to the long-cold winters. I check mine regularly to see how their personal honey supply is holding up and I'll supplement feed them on sugar syrup if they're running low. My girls must have known a hard winter was coming because they put away a lot of honey last fall and they still have a good supply left. Once the nectar starts to flow I'll throw a honey super back on the hive and they'll be right back in production.

I'm not speaking for your friend in Latvia, but I know that many beekeepers in my area keep 4 or more hives and don't do much to take care of them. They just let them take care of themselves and if they lose a couple hives then they'll still have another one to that'll make it. Can you imagine raising kids under that kind of mentality. Seems like another logical product of our synthetic society.
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Re: Another Illinois 'stead

Postby Lollykoko » Fri Apr 12, 2013 8:05 pm

I was reading about dandelions earlier and discovered that they are a great source of nectar for honeybees, as well as being a long term source of pollen throughout the year. As more and more homeowners are using Round-up to keep their lawns golf course perfect, I can see where bees are reaching a critical shortage. http://www.botanical.com/botanical/mgmh/d/dandel08.html
Each bloom is made up of numerous strapshaped florets of a bright golden yellow. This strap-shaped corolla is notched at the edge into five teeth, each tooth representing a petal, and lower down is narrowed into a claw-like tube, which rests on the singlechambered ovary containing a single ovule. In this tiny tube is a copious supply of nectar, which more than half fills it, and the presence of which provides the incentive for the visits of many insects, among whom the bee takes first rank. The Dandelion takes an important place among honey-producing plants, as it furnishes considerable quantities of both pollen and nectar in the early spring, when the bees' harvest from fruit trees is nearly over. It is also important from the beekeeper's point of view, because not only does it flower most in spring, no matter how cool the weather may be, but a small succession of bloom is also kept up until late autumn, so that it is a source of honey after the main flowers have ceased to bloom, thus delaying the need for feeding the colonies of bees with artificial food.

The website also offers suggestions for use of the dandelion to affect your health, well-being, and pleasure. The recipe for dandelion wine is included ...
The dried Dandelion leaves are also employed as an ingredient in many digestive or diet drinks and herb beers. Dandelion Beer is a rustic fermented drink common in many parts of the country and made also in Canada. Workmen in the furnaces and potteries of the industrial towns of the Midlands have frequent resource to many of the tonic Herb Beers, finding them cheaper and less intoxicating than ordinary beer, and Dandelion stout ranks as a favourite. An agreeable and wholesome fermented drink is made from Dandelions, Nettles and Yellow Dock.

In Berkshire and Worcestershire, the flowers are used in the preparation of a beverage known as Dandelion Wine. This is made by pouring a gallon of boiling water over a gallon of the flowers. After being well stirred, it is covered with a blanket and allowed to stand for three days, being stirred again at intervals, after which it is strained and the liquor boiled for 30 minutes, with the addition of 3 1/2 lb. of loaf sugar, a little ginger sliced, the rind of 1 orange and 1 lemon sliced. When cold, a little yeast is placed in it on a piece of toast, producing fermentation. It is then covered over and allowed to stand two days until it has ceased 'working,' when it is placed in a cask, well bunged down for two months before bottling. This wine is suggestive of sherry slightly flat, and has the deserved reputation of being an excellent tonic, extremely good for the blood.

The roasted roots are largely used to form Dandelion Coffee, being first thoroughly cleaned, then dried by artificial heat, and slightly roasted till they are the tint of coffee, when they are ground ready for use. The roots are taken up in the autumn, being then most fitted for this purpose. The prepared powder is said to be almost indistinguishable from real coffee, and is claimed to be an improvement to inferior coffee, which is often an adulterated product. Of late years, Dandelion Coffee has come more into use in this country, being obtainable at most vegetarian restaurants and stores. Formerly it used occasionally to be given for medicinal purposes, generally mixed with true coffee to give it a better flavour. The ground root was sometimes mixed with chocolate for a similar purpose. Dandelion Coffee is a natural beverage without any of the injurious effects that ordinary tea and coffee have on the nerves and digestive organs. It exercises a stimulating influence over the whole system, helping the liver and kidneys to do their work and keeping the bowels in a healthy condition, so that it offers great advantages to dyspeptics and does not cause wakefulness.
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