Herbal Learning

Links and discussion to broaden our horizons

Moderator: matt walker

Herbal Learning

Postby Lollykoko » Mon Nov 11, 2013 5:45 pm

I am seeing so many wonderful videos that may be helpful to others, I thought I would start one thread to contain various sorts of plant information. Hope that at least one person gets some good out of it! If you have a favorite plant used for nutrition or healing, please share!

I had the opportunity to see Rosemary Gladstar while I was at the M.E.N. Fair and she talked about this tonic among others. Now that I have the recipe fresh in mind, I need to head to the store for some items not already in my kitchen, like horseradish root and fresh ginger. http://youtu.be/JU8U0bDmXks
User avatar
Lollykoko
 
Posts: 575
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 9:04 pm
Location: Howard and Miami Counties, Indiana

Re: Herbal Learning

Postby Lollykoko » Tue Nov 12, 2013 3:28 pm

Elderberries are a great resource for keeping the immune system in good shape. Common wisdom says that it was the use of elderberry that helped people survive epidemics like the plague in the Middle Ages and the influenza outbreak a century ago.

Herbalism ... So easy that a child can do it! http://youtu.be/lFkQ39rOB3o
User avatar
Lollykoko
 
Posts: 575
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 9:04 pm
Location: Howard and Miami Counties, Indiana

Re: Herbal Learning

Postby Myrth » Thu Nov 14, 2013 1:25 pm

I had elder berries at my last place. I love them! Not only are they great for treating cold and flu, they make a wonderful jam! They are on my must get planted list for spring at the new place.
User avatar
Myrth
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2013 4:04 am

Re: Herbal Learning

Postby Myrth » Thu Nov 14, 2013 1:33 pm

One of my favorite online research resources for all things green is the plants for a future database. It is quite good and accurate.

This is a link to St. John's wort, a wonderful healing herb that fights viral infections as well as mild to moderate depression, amongst its many uses. http://www.pfaf.org/user/Plant.aspx?LatinName=Hypericum+perforatum

This is one of the many medicinal herbs destined to be planted in my hedgerows.
User avatar
Myrth
 
Posts: 83
Joined: Mon Feb 25, 2013 4:04 am

Re: Herbal Learning

Postby mannytheseacow » Fri Nov 15, 2013 1:42 am

I really like this thread. Thanks you two for sharing. I've been making different tinctures of honey for years but I have a lot to learn. I definitely want to incorporate much more herbal farming at my place this next growing season.

So what's the story with elderberries, anyway? I've seen the jelly and the wine, but I remember having them growing on our fencerow when I was a kid and mom said they were poisonous. I guess if you cook them they're ok but what about the wine and the herbal therapy? Do they need to be cooked before fermenting and does the poison go away when they're dried?
"Knowledge is power. Arm yourself."
User avatar
mannytheseacow
 
Posts: 940
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 12:40 am

Re: Herbal Learning

Postby Lollykoko » Fri Nov 15, 2013 7:04 am

Myrth, thank you for the information on St. Johns Wort. It looks like something I might have a chance of growing, somewhere on the property! So far I've only been doing research on the stuff that is already there. Perhaps it's time to look at new items that will work in my climate.

Manny, I have never heard that elderberries were poisonous. And it's always time for me to learn a little bit more. This article says if they aren't ripe, they can cause stomach distress. http://www.thebestofrawfood.com/benefits-of-elderberry.html

I'm glad I went looking for information, since I hadn't seen that particular video before. At the end, he is talking about the danger of confusing water hemlock with elderberry. I know just how possible that can be, until you learn what you are looking at. When I first bought my place, the bottom ground was infested with hemlock. It took several years of mowing to get the situation under control. Now the elderberry is creeping down out of the woods, moving across land that is currently too damp for pasture.

For about the past eight months I've been using elderberry syrup (about an ounce) in my daily juice drink. Since the M.E.N. Fair, sometimes add dried berries to a cup of mixed (hot) herb tea. I bought some dried blossom that I intend to use in a cold infusion. This year I had a plentiful crop, but wasn't able to spend time at the farm to harvest at the peak, and the birds got benefit of everything. Hopefully I will have a better plan next year, and about 3 more women to go out with me to harvest fruit for a couple of hours.

FWIW, I rarely get ill. If that is because of the immune system boost that comes form elderberry, it's a good thing.
User avatar
Lollykoko
 
Posts: 575
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 9:04 pm
Location: Howard and Miami Counties, Indiana

Re: Herbal Learning

Postby mannytheseacow » Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:07 am

Here's something I was reading on elderberry toxicity:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sambucus
(check out the section on toxicity)

Not that Wikipedia is a good source, but interesting.... The sources listed in that section seem credible. I'll keep looking for more info.
"Knowledge is power. Arm yourself."
User avatar
mannytheseacow
 
Posts: 940
Joined: Sun Feb 24, 2013 12:40 am

Re: Herbal Learning

Postby pa_friendly_guy » Tue Nov 19, 2013 12:22 am

That is interesting. I had heard that the stems, leaves and branches of the elderberry were poisonous, but I had never heard that the uncooked berries were poisonous. I know that I have eaten some of the uncooked berries when picking them, but not too many because the are some what bitter that way. Much better in a pie with a lot of sugar. ;)
Never doubt that a small group of dedicated people can change the world, indeed it is the only thing that ever has.
User avatar
pa_friendly_guy
 
Posts: 1499
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 9:24 pm
Location: SW Pa They changed me to zone 6a what ever that is. I still figure zone 5

Re: Herbal Learning

Postby Lollykoko » Tue Nov 19, 2013 6:17 pm

I'm feeling a little bit sniffley this morning, so I put onion honey in my tea cup. :lol:

Looking at all the loose teas I have been acquiring sent me off for another good video to increase my knowledge. Tinctures seem like an easy thing to begin with and I have been stockpiling vodka just for that reason. Now to find a video that works with the resources I have available in the kitchen today! ~~ I wish I had bought more than one and two ounce packages while I was at M.E.N. Fair. Now to take a minute to find some small jelly jars.

On a sustainable note, I have mullein growing at Lollyland, and think there is some echinacea growing wild. Whether or not, cone-flower is beautiful, and well worth my time and effort to plant some in a place where I can enjoy the view, as well as the healing properties. http://youtu.be/E6HzKTKb_rc
User avatar
Lollykoko
 
Posts: 575
Joined: Sun Jan 08, 2012 9:04 pm
Location: Howard and Miami Counties, Indiana

Re: Herbal Learning

Postby DevilsBrew » Tue Dec 03, 2013 12:27 am

I second the Echinacea. I feel better tonight and I do believe that is one of the reasons.

Loose leaf tea. Love it. I try to stick with the green based blends because of the health benefits. I tried Kombucha tea for the first time last week but I don't think I will try it again after I researched the term online and read about the negative side effects.
EatPrayLaugh
DevilsBrew
 
Posts: 375
Joined: Tue Sep 17, 2013 4:55 pm
Location: Lover of The Freakshows of Flaming Death


Return to Educational Resources

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

cron